Idioms

Learn idioms with comprehensive meaning, examples and origin details.

Idioms

Idioms related to Ear

all ears

all ears

Meaning:

  • saying that you are all ears means the other person has got your full attention in terms of listening to him
  • very keen to hear
  • paying special attention

Synonym:
attentive, vigilant, lively, careful

Example:

  1. Kids in my class were all ears when I was telling them the story.
  2. She expected her fiance to be all ears when she was telling him about the wedding plans.
  3. I was all years when my grandfather was telling about his adventure trip to Himalayas in his youth.
  4. As soon as he heard about the announcement of lottery results on the TV, he was all ears as he himself had purchased five of them.
  5. When the prime minister came on the stage and started his speech, the audience were all ears with the noisy auditorium suddenly becoming quiet.
  6. There was a pin drop silence in the courtroom and everybody were all ears as the robber started to confess his crimes.

Usage:
The purpose of using this phrase is to convey the person being said to is that he is being given full undivided attention.

Origin:
This phrase got originated back in 18th century. By nature we hear from our ears, so all ears means we are using our both ears to listen someone. All ears give the meaning of attention, care, interest of listening someone keenly.

play by ear

play by ear

Meaning:

  • learn music by ear
  • to play by remembering the tune, without printed music
  • to play a musical instrument by remembering the tune and not by reading the music

Examples:

  1. My sister learned to play the piano by ear when she was a child.
  2. Hey, Jill I can play the keyboard by ear, without printed music.
  3. I never tried to play the guitar by ear but I can try for you.
  4. One friend of mine easily play the Saxophone by ear.
  5. After a hard work of many year finally I’ve been able to play any music instrument by ear now.

See also: play it by ear

play it by ear

play it by ear

Meaning:

  • improvise
  • act without preparation
  • to let things go as they may
  • determined on the circumstances
  • according to the demand of the situation

Examples:

  1. Rather than adopting a new academic strategy, the principal decided to play it by ear.
  2. I don’t know what I will do when she will come in front of me. Let’s just play it by ear.
  3. I am not sure whether my plan will work or not, so let just play it by ear.
  4. Jane said that she has to play it by ear because she is not sure where to go tomorrow morning.
  5. It’s hard to know how the situation will develop. Let’s just play it by ear.
  6. We can play it by ear and decide where to meet later.
  7. Question: Hey, Bob are you coming to play the baseball this Sunday?
    Answer: I am not sure Nobita, let’s play it by ear.

Origin:
Mid-1900s

See also: play by ear

turn a deaf ear

turn a deaf ear

Meaning:
– choose not to hear
– refuse to listen
– to ignore what someone says

Examples:
1. Please do not just turn a deaf ear to their cries for help.
2. This was too cheap when Sarah turned a deaf ear to our insistent.
3. The Bank tended to turn a deaf ear to ATM card lost complaints.
4. When I asked Michael to go with me for help he just turned a deaf ear.
5. How can you turned a deaf ear to the crying victims of accident.

Origin:
This idiomatic expression dates from the first half of the 1400s and was in most proverb collections from 1546 on.

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