Idioms

Learn idioms with comprehensive meaning, examples and origin details.

Idioms

Idioms related to Betrayal

sell someone out

sell someone out

Meaning:

  • to betray someone
  • to let someone’s secret out
  • to reveal damaging information about someone

Example:

  1. The company had put a lot of trust on him, but he sold them out by leaking confidential information to the competitors.
  2. Celebrities have a hard time keeping secrets. Most of the time its their close friends who sell them out to the media.
  3. I had trusted you to keep my secret. I can’t believe that you sold me out!
  4. They wanted to keep the news under wraps to avoid a scandal, but someone on the inside sold them out.
  5. Can I trust you with this piece of information or will you sell me out?
  6. Hardened criminals are tough to crack. They don’t easily sell their accomplices out, even if it means torture for them.
  7. There has been a misunderstanding! Why would I sell you out? It must have been someone else.
  8. He can be trusted with that information. He will not sell us out under any circumstances.

Origin:
The origin of this phrase is not clear.

viper in bosom

viper in bosom

Meaning:

  • a person who deceives you after receiving help from you
  • an unappreciative friend

Example:

  1. I got my friend a good position in my company and all he did is convinced my manger to get him the designation I had in the project. He was no more than a viper in my bosom.
  2. He provided Anaya shelter in his house when she was rendered homeless & she kept stealing money from his cupboard until he knew that she was a viper in his bosom.
  3. She was confident of their relation being truthful and transparent to only know that she has nursed a viper in her bosom all these years: Her husband eloped with a younger woman of the age of his daughter.
  4. Only after the police arrested him for sheltering a friend involved in terrorist activities did he know that all these years he had been nursing a viper in his bosom.

Origin:
The phrase has originated from one of the tales of Aesop, in which a farmer who gives shelter to a viper dying from cold is eventually bitten by the viper after its recovery. The similar thought is also found in Latin ( insinu viperam habere) & the expression is found in various forms in English from late 16th century after it was referred by Shakespeare and Chaucher.

show true colors

show true colors
Meaning: betray, reveal oneself as one is really.
Example: I trusted her blindly but when I was in need too much and called her for help, she showed her true colors and even she don’t pick my phone now.

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